interior monologue during the first panel: “I AM NO MAN.”

(via spacebromance)

- I endeavor to be accurate.
- You do quite well.

(Source: kirknspock, via autumn-drifts)

leupagus:

sagansense:

For those who missed it, NPR interviewed Neil deGrasse Tyson (Astrophysicist, Director of the Hayden Planetarium in the Rose Center for Earth and Space at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in NYC and host of the new 13-part television series, 'Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey’) in a segment called ‘Neil DeGrasse Tyson Explains Why The Cosmos Shouldn’t Make You Feel Small’.
NPR interview highlights:
On how to balance science and show biz…[I don’t think] that one of the two has to be compromised for the both to be successful, I don’t agree with that premise. I think if you have not thought deeply of how to communicate science you might get stuck saying, “OK, I have to dumb this down. I have to be flashy but with no real content.” But if you really think deeply about the visualizations, the visual effects and the content, you get to have both.
On what Gravity got wrong…Cosmos has as its priority to get the science right, above all else, and we will then tell the story with the properly represented science. In Hollywood … I think they take some latitudes, either out of ignorance, or because they feel as though the truth would somehow constrain their flexibility of storytelling.
In the film Gravity … I just felt compelled to put out 10 tweets or so on things I thought they could’ve gotten right but they didn’t get right. … One of which was, why is it that Sandra Bullock, who is portraying a medical doctor, is fixing my Hubble Space Telescope! Get her the hell off my telescope! As an astrophysicist I don’t walk into her operating room and say, “I got this.” … So little things like that, and I was just having fun.
… For example, her hair — her hair should’ve been sort of floating in zero-G and it was not. It was like heavy mousse, or something, that kept that stuff down. … That’s the first thing we notice when we see astronauts floating in space is the hair sticking up and it’s kind of comical and funny, it’s the great reminder that they’re in zero-G.
On Pluto losing its status as a planet…So Pluto is not only the littlest planet, all right, that alone shouldn’t hurt it, but more than half of its volume is ice. No other planet has that. So if you moved it to where Earth is right now, heat from the sun would evaporate the ice and it would grow a tail. That’s no kind of behavior for a planet!
Pluto, its orbit is elongated so severely that it crosses the orbit of Neptune. Now, we have words for objects that cross the orbits of other planets and are made of mostly ice; they’re called comets. By the way, there are six moons in the solar system that are bigger than Pluto including Earth’s moon, which is five times the mass of Pluto. So really, Pluto was never the ninth planet, it was the first of a new class of objects that we didn’t really discover the rest of until the early 1990s.
On the big questions astronomers are trying to answer…We can measure the influence of this thing we call dark energy which is forcing an acceleration of the expanding universe. We don’t know what that is, we don’t know anything about it, other than what it’s doing to the universe.
Then 85 percent of the gravity of the universe has a point of origin about which we know nothing. We account for all the matter and energy that we’re familiar with, measure up how much gravity it should have, it’s about one-sixth of the gravity that’s actually operating on the universe. We call that dark matter, but what we should call it is “dark gravity.” We don’t know what that is either.
We don’t know how [Earth] went from inanimate organic molecules to self-replicating life. We got top people working on that as well.
We don’t know what was around before the universe. We don’t know what is at the center of a black hole. We don’t know whether or not the universe is actually one of many in a multiverse. We want to know if there’s life thriving in under ice oceans of Jupiter’s moon Europa.
… But my favorite question is one that we don’t even know to ask yet because it’s a question that would arise upon answering these questions I just delivered to you. … If you’re a scientist and you have to have an answer, even in the absence of data, you’re not going to be a good scientist.
On becoming an “innovation nation”…When we find an asteroid headed our way, what’s your first thought? Is it “run!” or “stockpile toilet paper!”? No. If that’s your first thought, you are not an innovation nation. If you have enough people who are influenced by this way of thinking, the innovative way of thinking, their first thought is, “How do we deflect that asteroid? How do we destroy that asteroid? How do we mine that asteroid?” … That’s a culture that I don’t think the United States is a part of right now.
On the “cosmic perspective”…You will never find people who truly grasp the cosmic perspective … leading nations into battle. No, that doesn’t happen. When you have a cosmic perspective there’s this little speck called Earth and you say, “You’re going to what? You’re on this side of a line in the sand and you want to kill people for what? Oh, to pull oil out of the ground, what? WHAT?” … Not enough people in this world, I think, carry a cosmic perspective with them. It could be life changing.
On how he (very) briefly considered a career as an exotic dancer…You’re broke in graduate school, basically, and I was flexible from having danced and I was pretty cut from having wrestled, and I also rode and so on the dance team there were some fellow male dancers who told me about this club, these ladies’ club but there are these male dancers, and they said they danced moves we do just in the normal training for our dance performances … and they invited me because I needed more money, I was broke.
So I went just to observe it [to see] if it was something I could do and they came out with jock straps having been soaked in lighter fluid, asbestos jock straps, ignited, coming out dancing to Jerry Lee Lewis’ “Great Balls of Fire.”
I said, “Nope. Not for me.” I’m embarrassed to say that it wasn’t until that moment when I said to myself, “Maybe I should be a math tutor.” I don’t know why I didn’t think of that first.
Read/listen to the entire 38:28 interview HERE.
In other “Cosmos-related" news….Fox & Nat Geo To Preview ‘Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey’ At Inaugural White House Film Festival [via Deadline]

GREAT BALLS OF FIRE 

leupagus:

sagansense:

For those who missed it, NPR interviewed Neil deGrasse Tyson (Astrophysicist, Director of the Hayden Planetarium in the Rose Center for Earth and Space at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in NYC and host of the new 13-part television series, 'Cosmos: A Space Time Odyssey) in a segment called Neil DeGrasse Tyson Explains Why The Cosmos Shouldn’t Make You Feel Small.

NPR interview highlights:

imageOn how to balance science and show biz…
[I don’t think] that one of the two has to be compromised for the both to be successful, I don’t agree with that premise. I think if you have not thought deeply of how to communicate science you might get stuck saying, “OK, I have to dumb this down. I have to be flashy but with no real content.” But if you really think deeply about the visualizations, the visual effects and the content, you get to have both.

imageOn what Gravity got wrong…
Cosmos has as its priority to get the science right, above all else, and we will then tell the story with the properly represented science. In Hollywood … I think they take some latitudes, either out of ignorance, or because they feel as though the truth would somehow constrain their flexibility of storytelling.

In the film Gravity … I just felt compelled to put out 10 tweets or so on things I thought they could’ve gotten right but they didn’t get right. … One of which was, why is it that Sandra Bullock, who is portraying a medical doctor, is fixing my Hubble Space Telescope! Get her the hell off my telescope! As an astrophysicist I don’t walk into her operating room and say, “I got this.” … So little things like that, and I was just having fun.

… For example, her hair — her hair should’ve been sort of floating in zero-G and it was not. It was like heavy mousse, or something, that kept that stuff down. … That’s the first thing we notice when we see astronauts floating in space is the hair sticking up and it’s kind of comical and funny, it’s the great reminder that they’re in zero-G.

imageOn Pluto losing its status as a planet…
So Pluto is not only the littlest planet, all right, that alone shouldn’t hurt it, but more than half of its volume is ice. No other planet has that. So if you moved it to where Earth is right now, heat from the sun would evaporate the ice and it would grow a tail. That’s no kind of behavior for a planet!

Pluto, its orbit is elongated so severely that it crosses the orbit of Neptune. Now, we have words for objects that cross the orbits of other planets and are made of mostly ice; they’re called comets. By the way, there are six moons in the solar system that are bigger than Pluto including Earth’s moon, which is five times the mass of Pluto. So really, Pluto was never the ninth planet, it was the first of a new class of objects that we didn’t really discover the rest of until the early 1990s.

imageOn the big questions astronomers are trying to answer…
We can measure the influence of this thing we call dark energy which is forcing an acceleration of the expanding universe. We don’t know what that is, we don’t know anything about it, other than what it’s doing to the universe.

Then 85 percent of the gravity of the universe has a point of origin about which we know nothing. We account for all the matter and energy that we’re familiar with, measure up how much gravity it should have, it’s about one-sixth of the gravity that’s actually operating on the universe. We call that dark matter, but what we should call it is “dark gravity.” We don’t know what that is either.

We don’t know how [Earth] went from inanimate organic molecules to self-replicating life. We got top people working on that as well.

We don’t know what was around before the universe. We don’t know what is at the center of a black hole. We don’t know whether or not the universe is actually one of many in a multiverse. We want to know if there’s life thriving in under ice oceans of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

… But my favorite question is one that we don’t even know to ask yet because it’s a question that would arise upon answering these questions I just delivered to you. … If you’re a scientist and you have to have an answer, even in the absence of data, you’re not going to be a good scientist.

imageOn becoming an “innovation nation”…
When we find an asteroid headed our way, what’s your first thought? Is it “run!” or “stockpile toilet paper!”? No. If that’s your first thought, you are not an innovation nation. If you have enough people who are influenced by this way of thinking, the innovative way of thinking, their first thought is, “How do we deflect that asteroid? How do we destroy that asteroid? How do we mine that asteroid?” … That’s a culture that I don’t think the United States is a part of right now.

imageOn the “cosmic perspective”…
You will never find people who truly grasp the cosmic perspective … leading nations into battle. No, that doesn’t happen. When you have a cosmic perspective there’s this little speck called Earth and you say, “You’re going to what? You’re on this side of a line in the sand and you want to kill people for what? Oh, to pull oil out of the ground, what? WHAT?” … Not enough people in this world, I think, carry a cosmic perspective with them. It could be life changing.

imageOn how he (very) briefly considered a career as an exotic dancer…
You’re broke in graduate school, basically, and I was flexible from having danced and I was pretty cut from having wrestled, and I also rode and so on the dance team there were some fellow male dancers who told me about this club, these ladies’ club but there are these male dancers, and they said they danced moves we do just in the normal training for our dance performances … and they invited me because I needed more money, I was broke.

So I went just to observe it [to see] if it was something I could do and they came out with jock straps having been soaked in lighter fluid, asbestos jock straps, ignited, coming out dancing to Jerry Lee Lewis’ “Great Balls of Fire.”

I said, “Nope. Not for me.” I’m embarrassed to say that it wasn’t until that moment when I said to myself, “Maybe I should be a math tutor.” I don’t know why I didn’t think of that first.

Read/listen to the entire 38:28 interview HERE.

In other “Cosmos-related" news….Fox & Nat Geo To Preview ‘Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey’ At Inaugural White House Film Festival [via Deadline]

GREAT BALLS OF FIRE 

terriblerealestateagentphotos:

In the ultra-conservative world of soft furnishings, theirs was the love that dared not speak its name.
Follow on Twitter @BadRealtyPhotos

terriblerealestateagentphotos:

In the ultra-conservative world of soft furnishings, theirs was the love that dared not speak its name.

Follow on Twitter @BadRealtyPhotos

sushinfood:

justamerplwithabox:

vivelafat:

prokopetz:

officialdeadparrot:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 
Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.
On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.
The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”
And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:
[stifled giggling]
[reeeeeeally deep breath]
[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]
The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.
In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”
FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 
Everyone else go home

Oh man, so I play trombone, and we got this piece called Florentiner Marsch by Julius Fucik, and we saw this

which is 8 fortes. We were shocked until,

that is 24 fortes who the fuck does that

Who does that?

This guy. Take a good look - that is the moustache of a man with nothing to lose.

Julius IdontgivaFucik

More like Julius Fuckit


Pyrozod's tags for this were too hilarious not to share

sushinfood:

justamerplwithabox:

vivelafat:

prokopetz:

officialdeadparrot:

grellholmes:

elsajeni:

gunslingerannie:

justtkeepcalmm:

dean-and-his-pie:

fororchestra:

musicalmelody:

Fun Story: My director kept telling me and my tenor sax buddy to play softer. No matter what we did, it wasn’t soft enough for him. So getting frustrated, I told my buddy “Dont play this time. Just fake it” 

Our Band Director then informed us we sounded perfect. 

To my readers: “p” means quiet, “pp” means really quiet. I’ve never seen “pppp” before haha.

On the contrast, “f” means loud, and “ffff” probably means so loud you go unconscious.

I had ffff in a piece once and my conductor told me to play as loudly as physically possible without falling off my chair…

Me and my trombone buddies had “ffff” and he sat next to me and played so hard that he fell out of his chair.

The lengths we go for music.

Okay yeah so I play the bass clarinet and the amount of air you have to move and the stiffness of the reed means it only has two settings and that is loud and louder, with an optional LOUDEST that includes a 50% probability of HORRIBLE CROAKING NOISE which is the bass equivalent of the ubiquitous clarinet shriek.

One day, when I was in concert band in high school, we got a new piece handed out for the first time, and there was a strange little commotion back in the tuba section — whispering, and pointing at something in the music, and swatting at each other’s hands all shhh don’t call attention to it. And although they did attract the attention of basically everyone else in the band, they managed to avoid being noticed by the band director, who gave us a few minutes to look over our parts and then said, “All right, let’s run through it up to section A.”

And here we are, cheerfully playing along, sounding reasonably competent — but everyone, when they have the attention to spare, is keeping an eye on the tuba players. They don’t come in for the first eight measures or so, and then when they do come in, what we see is:

[stifled giggling]

[reeeeeeally deep breath]

[COLOSSAL FOGHORN NOISE]

The entire band stops dead, in the cacophonous kind of way that a band stops when it hasn’t actually been cued to stop. The band director doesn’t even say anything, just looks straight back at the tubas and makes a helpless sort of why gesture.

In unison, the tuba players defend themselves: “THERE WERE FOUR F’S.”

FFFF is not really a rational dynamic marking for any instrument, but for the love of all that is holy why would you put it in a tuba part.

This is the best band post 

Everyone else go home

Oh man, so I play trombone, and we got this piece called Florentiner Marsch by Julius Fucik, and we saw this

image

which is 8 fortes. We were shocked until,

image

that is 24 fortes who the fuck does that

Who does that?

This guy. Take a good look - that is the moustache of a man with nothing to lose.

Julius IdontgivaFucik

More like Julius Fuckit

Pyrozod's tags for this were too hilarious not to share

(Source: housecatincarnate)

patrickat:

kaiju3:

The American Hogwarts Houses

Look at your school of witchcraft and wizardry. Now look at mine. Now yours. Now back to mine. Sadly, your school is not mine, but if you all got off your broomsticks and started using a real sorcerer’s deodorant, it could smell like mine. Abracadabra! I’m a horse.

patrickat:

kaiju3:

The American Hogwarts Houses

Look at your school of witchcraft and wizardry. Now look at mine. Now yours. Now back to mine. Sadly, your school is not mine, but if you all got off your broomsticks and started using a real sorcerer’s deodorant, it could smell like mine. Abracadabra! I’m a horse.