jeffreyeugenides:


awwww-cute:

Ready for battle

joan of bark


CRY HAVOC AND LET SLIP THE DOGS OF WAR

jeffreyeugenides:

awwww-cute:

Ready for battle

joan of bark

CRY HAVOC AND LET SLIP THE DOGS OF WAR

(via iggybolton)

"What has changed in 450 years of performing, reading, writing Shakespeare? The history of women interacting with Shakespeare’s plays is also the history of women’s rights, suffrage, and of the feminist movement. It is a history of women being silenced and of finding ways to speak out anyway. Shakespeare has been, and is, an uneasy ally in this history. He complicates but also enriches our idea of what a woman is. Too often we are still Katherinas, forced to compromise our dignity in order to retain our voice, or else our insistence on speaking is blamed for our tragedies, like Juliet. But the reason why we still read Shakespeare’s women, is that they are women. Goneril, Juliet, and Katherina are finally not ciphers. Whatever else they may be, they are true women, and they have true voices."

Stefanie Peters,”450 Years of Juliets: On Women Making Shakespeare” (via millionsmillions)

Cymbeline: An Explanation

At the offices of the First Folio

EDITOR 1: Um, guys? Why is Cymbeline listed with the tragedies?
EDITOR 2: …Why wouldn’t it be?
EDITOR 1: Cymbeline doesn’t die.
EDITOR 2:
EDITOR 1: In fact, none of the main characters die.
EDITOR 2: But I thought he was banished from Rome and then rebels and then changes his mind and dies anyway!
EDITOR 1: That’s Coriolanus, dude.
EDITOR 2: …Oh. Whatever, that’s what it says in the title of the MS: The Tragedie of Cymbeline, King of Britain.
EDITOR 1: Give me that – this says The TROPE-BOMBING of Cymbeline!
EDITOR 2: Cut me some slack, Shakespeare’s handwriting sucks.

THE TRAGEDIE TROPE-BOMBING OF CYMBELINE, KING OF BRITAIN

ACT I

FIRST GENTLEMAN: As you know, Bob, our king Cymbeline is quite upset! His daughter, Imogen, his only remaining child after the mysterious disappearance of his two sons, has married his youthful ward, the classy but dirt-poor Posthumus!
SECOND GENTLEMAN: What a guy!
FIRST GENTLEMAN: Now Cymbeline’s imprisoned her and banished him, because he wanted Imogen to marry Cloten, his second wife's son!
SECOND GENTLEMAN: …I just wanted to know how you were doing, but thanks for the update, Gary.

QUEEN: Since I am totally not evil, I thought I’d let you two crazy kids have a final moment together before we throw Posthumus out on his ear!
IMOGEN: YOU’RE NOT MY REAL MOM. Oh, Posthumus! Take this diamond ring as an eternal sign of my devotion!
POSTHUMUS: Here, take this slap bracelet I got in a box of cereal as a sign of mine!
QUEEN: Hurry it along, folks! We wouldn’t want the king to overhear IMOGEN AND POSTHUMUS MAKING OUT IN THE GARDEN, LIKE, RIGHT OVER HERE BY THE BOX HEDGES.
CYMBELINE: YOU ARE BOTH GROUNDED FOREVER. IMOGEN, GO TO YOUR ROOM. POSTHUMUS, GO TO YOUR ROME.

Read More

"I want to do all different roles. I mean, I’d like to play a super hero, when is Spider-Man going to fight a brother? I’d love to do an epic film. I’d love to be in a love story. I’m from Juilliard so I’d love to do Shakespeare with Kenneth Branagh."

Anthony Mackie, USA Today Q&A, 2004

Get on that, Sir Kenneth. Get on that posthaste.

(via minim-calibre)

I mean, given that Kenneth Branagh also directed Thor, can we just have all of these in one movie (series)? Because I’m thinking a super-powered Henriad.

"When we took Shakespeare’s “Measure for Measure” into a maximum security woman’s prison on the West Side…there’s a scene there where a young woman is told by a very powerful official that “If you sleep with me, I will pardon your brother. And if you don’t sleep with me, I’ll execute him.” And he leaves the stage. And this character, Isabel, turned out to the audience and said: “To whom should I complain?” And a woman in the audience shouted: “The Police!” And then she looked right at that woman and said: “If I did relate this, who would believe me?” And the woman answered back, “No one, girl.” And it was astonishing because not only was it an amazing sense of connection between the audience and the actress, but you also realized that this was a kind of an historical lesson in theater reception. That’s what must have happened at The Globe. These soliloquies were not simply monologues that people spoke, they were call and response to the audience. And you realized that vibrancy, that that sense of connectedness is not only what makes theater great in prisons, it’s what makes theater great, period."

Oskar Eustis on ArtBeat Nation (he told the same story on Charlie Rose)

(Source: neverwasastoryofmorewhoa)

To all the Tumblr users who tend to use tags very liberally:

thejadedkiwano:

Let’s play a game.

Type the following words into your tags box, then post the first automatic tag that comes up.

you

also

what

when

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look

because

never